The Tentmaker

What did Paul do for a living before his Damascus meeting with Jesus?  We learn in today’s reading from the Acts of the Apostles that he was a tentmaker by trade.

Paul left Athens and went to Corinth.
There he met a Jew named Aquila, a native of Pontus,
who had recently come from Italy with his wife Priscilla
because Claudius had ordered all the Jews to leave Rome.
He went to visit them and, because he practiced the same trade,
stayed with them and worked, for they were tentmakers by trade.
Every sabbath, he entered into discussions in the synagogue,
attempting to convince both Jews and Greeks.

When Silas and Timothy came down from Macedonia,
Paul began to occupy himself totally with preaching the word,
testifying to the Jews that the Christ was Jesus.
When they opposed him and reviled him,
he shook out his garments and said to them,
“Your blood be on your heads!
I am clear of responsibility.
From now on I will go to the Gentiles.”
So he left there and went to a house
belonging to a man named Titus Justus, a worshiper of God;
his house was next to a synagogue.
Crispus, the synagogue official, came to believe in the Lord
along with his entire household, and many of the Corinthians
who heard believed and were baptized.

Why do we care about Paul’s profession?  Because it reminds us that it doesn’t matter who we are or what we do for a living.  What does matter is that we follow Jesus in the midst of our busy lives.  Jesus uses us for his purpose.  That is what discipleship is all about.

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Service is Love

Many of us think that our acts of charity and love have to be performed on a grand stage. This is not the teaching of our church.  Often it the simple and mundane actions done in love that change the world.

Your service, no matter how small, is pleasing to our Father in Heaven.

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Give Thanks


Do we give thanks every hour of every day?

I will give thanks to you, O LORD, with all my heart,
for you have heard the words of my mouth;
in the presence of the angels I will sing your praise;
I will worship at your holy temple,
and give thanks to your name.

Because of your kindness and your truth,
you have made great above all things
your name and your promise.
When I called, you answered me;
you built up strength within me.

Your right hand saves me.
The LORD will complete what he has done for me;
your kindness, O LORD, endures forever;
forsake not the work of your hands.

Give thanks with a grateful heart!

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Wisdom of Peter

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Keep the Commandments

In today’s gospel, Jesus instructs us to keep his commandments, to love the Lord and our neighbor.  How do we do that?

When I was a kid in Catholic School, we had to memorize the Ten Commandments.  Now that I’m an adult, I think about them even more.  Want to examine your conscience? Refer back to the Ten Commandments.

Jesus said to his disciples:
“As the Father loves me, so I also love you.
Remain in my love.
If you keep my commandments, you will remain in my love,
just as I have kept my Father’s commandments
and remain in his love.

“I have told you this so that
my joy might be in you and
your joy might be complete.”

In case you have forgotten, here’s the list:

  1. I am the LORD your God. You shall worship the Lord your God and Him only shall you serve.
  2. You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain.
  3. Remember to keep holy the Sabbath day.
  4. Honor your father and your mother.
  5. You shall not kill.
  6. You shall not commit adultery.
  7. You shall not steal.
  8. You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.
  9. You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife.
  10. You shall not covet your neighbor’s goods.

Pretty good words to live by, don’t you think?

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Form Over Substance

In today’s first reading we hear an argument between Jewish followers of Jesus and Gentiles over the issue of  circumcision.  The Jews believed that circumcision was required to be a Christian.  The Gentile believers disagreed. Of course, over time the Church determined that circumcision was not a requirement to become a member of Christ’s church.

What is interesting about the debate is our natural  inclination to focus on the external aspects of being a follower of Jesus.  In essence, we sometimes are more concerned with form over substance.

Some who had come down from Judea were instructing the brothers,
“Unless you are circumcised according to the Mosaic practice,
you cannot be saved.”
Because there arose no little dissension and debate
by Paul and Barnabas with them,
it was decided that Paul, Barnabas, and some of the others
should go up to Jerusalem to the Apostles and presbyters
about this question.
They were sent on their journey by the Church,
and passed through Phoenicia and Samaria
telling of the conversion of the Gentiles,
and brought great joy to all the brethren.
When they arrived in Jerusalem,
they were welcomed by the Church,
as well as by the Apostles and the presbyters,
and they reported what God had done with them.
But some from the party of the Pharisees who had become believers
stood up and said, “It is necessary to circumcise them
and direct them to observe the Mosaic law.”

The Apostles and the presbyters met together to see about this matter.

The rules and rituals that give us comfort and guidance are important.  However, we cannot neglect the interior experience of a deep and personal relationship with Jesus Christ.

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A Different Time

Today’s first reading from the Acts of the Apostles reveals that the early Christians endured the most severe persecutions by remaining steadfast in their faith in the Lord Jesus.  Paul was so severely beaten by the the Jews in Antioch and Iconium that they believed that he had been killed.

Today, Christianity is the largest faith among world religions.  It is rare that Christians are martyred for their faith in Jesus.  I wonder about how many of us would be willing to give up our lives, as St. Paul ultimately did.

In those days, some Jews from Antioch and Iconium
arrived and won over the crowds.
They stoned Paul and dragged him out of the city,
supposing that he was dead.
But when the disciples gathered around him,
he got up and entered the city.
On the following day he left with Barnabas for Derbe.

After they had proclaimed the good news to that city
and made a considerable number of disciples,
they returned to Lystra and to Iconium and to Antioch.
They strengthened the spirits of the disciples
and exhorted them to persevere in the faith, saying,
“It is necessary for us to undergo many hardships
to enter the Kingdom of God.”
They appointed presbyters for them in each Church and,
with prayer and fasting, commended them to the Lord
in whom they had put their faith.
Then they traveled through Pisidia and reached Pamphylia.
After proclaiming the word at Perga they went down to Attalia.
From there they sailed to Antioch,
where they had been commended to the grace of God
for the work they had now accomplished.
And when they arrived, they called the Church together
and reported what God had done with them
and how he had opened the door of faith to the Gentiles.
Then they spent no little time with the disciples.

We live in a different world than those who lived in the first century. Would we make the decision to risk our lives for the faith?

Would we give up our lives for Jesus?

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